Monday, 15 May 2017

Tim Dinsdale Prepares His First Book

A bit of Loch Ness Monster history here as I reproduce a letter Tim Dinsdale wrote to Herman Cockrell dated February 1st 1961. Tim was in the late stages of completing his seminal book "Loch Ness Monster" and sought Herman's permission to reproduce his classic 1958 photograph of the creature. 




Indeed, the photo had formed part of the 1959 magazine article that inspired Tim to study the phenomenon and head north to Loch Ness where he obtained his famous film footage in April 1960. Click on the images of the letter, then right click for "View Image" to read them.










I have edited out Tim's address, but looking around the web, it appears to have been sold over 20 years ago. If you want to know what Tim's house looked like, take a look below.




The author can be contacted at lochnesskelpie@gmail.com

8 comments:

  1. This is fantastic. How did you acquire this -- Cockrell's son?

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    1. Yes, there is still a bit of stuff to work through.

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  2. Ah, typewriters. I remember using my Dad's just before PCs came out. Tippex was the equivalent of backspace.

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  3. I have to admire the things you find from the past Roland. Keep up the gr8 work that makes your blog so readable.

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    1. Plenty of old stuff out there - if only people would let us at them!

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  4. Interesting, Dinsdale's passion is still evident.

    Would that be the T. McLeod shore sighting Tim mentions ? a truly mammoth beast if we are to believe his account.

    I'm not sure why Tim thinks Whyte's book is courageous, maybe just a bit of hyperbole. Writing and publishing books is hardly a selfless undertaking, it's a money making exercise after all.

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    1. Yes it was and a mammoth was up to 11 feet at shoulder height. A bit of an understatement then.

      Why did Tim think Whyte's book was courageous? As I recall, she was a GP and her husband was a manager on the caledonian canal. Publishing a book on a "joke" subject like Nessie would not exactly be a career enhancing move for either of them.

      As for money making, she wrote it having no idea whether it would make much or not.

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  5. Well, Dinsdale wasn't exactly a stranger to hyperbolic description...

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